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“Hypercalcemia of Malignancy” may not be due to malignancy

The term “hypercalcemia of malignancy” is routinely used when calcium is elevated and PTH is below normal, and for good reason— this situation is often a result of malignant neoplasia, particularly lymphoma, anal sac adenocarcinoma, or multiple myeloma.  However, many other diseases can fall into this category such as granulomatous disease, hyperthyroidism, vitamin D intoxication, and Addison’s […] Read more »

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Vitamin D & Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an auto-immune disorder, is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation and can advance to protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), an often fatal disease.  Dogs with IBD are often low in vitamin D stores (25VitD) due to inappetence and/or impaired absorption. Studies (1,2) have found a correlation between the level of 25VitD and the canine […] Read more »

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Vitamin D & Obesity – Technical Brief

Obesity impacts vitamin D equilibrium.  Please review the tech brief below on how it applies to your Test & Treat patients. Contact VDI with any questions. Background: Vitamin D undergoes a series of enzymatic reactions ultimately becoming the active hormone calcitriol.  However, since vitamin D is fat soluble, it is readily taken up within the adipose tissue.  The adipose […] Read more »

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Vitamin D deficiency is increasingly linked to adverse outcomes

Cancer It has been reported that dogs and cats with lymphoma (2,11), mast cell tumors (5), hemangiosarcoma, carcinoma, histiocytic sarcoma, and other cancers (10,11,12) all have 25vitD values below 40ng/mL.  The relative risk of having cancer increases to almost 4x when 25vitD values are below 40ng/mL. Chronic Enteropathy (IBD) Disease severity and the incidence of chronic […] Read more »

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Atopic Dermatitis and Vitamin D

Published in Veterinary Record (1) is an interventional study on the effects of vitamin D supplementation on dogs with atopic dermatitis.  Conclusion: Oral vitamin D decreased both pruritus and also acute and chronic skin lesions in dogs with AD.  The improvement in the dogs with pruritus was significantly correlated with an increase in serum 25-OH-D3 […] Read more »

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Food Quality is Vital for reaching Vitamin D Sufficiency

The term vitamin D has become a catch-all for three different forms of vitamin D: D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3 (calcitriol), as well as the 24-hydroxylated components.  The routinely measured and primary store of vitamin D is 25(OH)D3. Vitamin D Metabolism In a dog or cats’ diet, the primary available format is both D3 and 25(OH)D3.  While commercial food […] Read more »

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Vitamin D Intoxication

Over the years, and just recently, there have been food recalls concerning excess vitamin D in pet food and reported ‘vitamin D intoxication’. Pets eating these foods and exhibiting signs of hypercalcemia are assumed to have vitamin D intoxication. Background: Vitamin D exists as three different forms: Vitamin D3  25-hydroxy-vitaminD (25(OH)D)  1,25-dihydroxy-vitaminD (calcitriol).  Both D3 and 25(OH)D are […] Read more »

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Let’s Test Vitamin D

VDI Laboratory – Leader in Vitamin D Testing Vitamin D shouldn’t be scary. Although the internet is abound with recalls and scary articles about toxicity, the bigger issue in a majority of cats and dogs is the pandemic of Vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D is as important for your pet as it is for you. […] Read more »

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Vitamin D Insufficiency – A Pandemic in American Pets

Vitamin D insufficiency is a major problem in cats and dogs in the United States.  According to a 2015 study out of Tufts University1, 75% of dogs are vitamin D insufficient.  We wanted to look at what that meant for real world pets. The real problem in real world patients VDI analyzed its database of […] Read more »

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Vitamin D Status Affects Heart Disease

Research in both human and veterinary medicine shows vitamin D to be an independent risk factor for adverse cardiac events.  Two recent studies looked at the association between Vitamin D levels and Chronic Valvular Heart Disease (CVHD). Kraus, et. al., found that in dogs, low stores of 25(OH)D were associated with CVHD, as well as a 2.6 times greater hazard of having a […] Read more »